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8.06.2015

Woven Necklace Kit in Joanns

 So much fun! A couple months ago I designed a woven necklace kit for the line Crafternoon by Hazel and Ruby and this week it is in Joann's stores everywhere! I love the concept of Crafternoon because their kits come with everything you need to make a project in an afternoon. They are great if you want to host a craft party or just be creative on your own. All of the projects that are part of this line are great - I'm going to pick up a few others for myself!

One of the great things about this project is that you can make it completely unique by switching up the order of the leather or the beads. The kit comes complete with a loom, warp and weft string, a needle, beads, leather and an instructional video put together by yours truly. One of the great things about this project is that you can make it completely unique by switching up the order of the leather or the beads. Just pop into your nearest Joann's store and pick one up!
This product was based on a tutorial I shared last year. Remember the original woven necklace?? If you want to go one step further you can follow the instructions to add gold leaf as well.
1. Dab some craft glue onto the woven necklace and let it dry for a couple minutes until it is tacky.
2. Carefully lay some gold leaf flakes ontop of the tacky glue. Let dry completely and then spray liberally with hairspray so that it doesn't rub off from wear and tear.


Now go visit my friend Lucy over at Craftberry Bush where she is introducing her kit for Crepe Flowers!

7.20.2015

Weaving How-To: Outlines

Weaving shapes sans color is a great way to keep a design bold and modern. To me, I like to imagine that the tapestry is a blank piece of paper with black sketches drawn right ontop. Although I chose to use a thicker roving for my outlines, a thin material would also look great. Below I hace included 3 different ways that I outlined my shapes. They may be obvious, well-known (and kindof cheating) but I always think the best stitches are the most simple!

Straight Horizontal
Start with a piece of string that is folded in half. The half that is on the bottom goes behind the next warp string. Then, because the two halves have switched places (so that the one on the bottom is now on the top) the half that is now on the bottom goes behind the next warp string. Repeat until the entire row is completed.


On the Diagonal
This is your basic soumac stitch. The string wraps behind two warp strings and in front of one. Then behind the next two and in front of another. This stitch can also be used for a straight horizontal outline, but it isn't as tight and so it can take the extra stretch of rising on a diagonal.

Straight Vertical
Usually when I want to create a vertical line I do it afterwards as an embroidery stitch. For this weave it had dual purposes, to create an outline and to sew my seam together. I wanted mine vertical stitch to be thicker than the horizontal and diagonal stitches, but it can be skinnier if you prefer.

6.21.2015

How to fill out your tassels.

Sometimes I like to add a little something besides fringe to the bottom of my tapestries. Especially if the piece doesn't have any fringe already, like my Arizona sunset weave above. I learned very quickly that the big, beautiful tassels you see don't happen automatically unless you use a loose spun fiber such as roving. 
The key to a great tassel is that most of the volume has to happen under the band. If you use the same amount of yarn in the cap as you do the skirt, chances are your tassel will have an 'athletic build' and be pretty much straight up and down.... but I'll share my secret with you!
1. Wrap yarn around your hand about 20 times, beginning and ending at the top.
2. Cut a 10" piece of yarn and slide it through the top of your tassel (the bottom of your hand).
3. Double knot the yarn to hold your tassel into place and then take it off your hand.
4. Cut another 10" piece of yarn and tie it about half an inch from the top of your tassel so that one end of the knot is much longer than the other. 
 5. Wrap the long end of your yarn around the tassel 5-6 times to create the band. Use a needle to pull the end down through the band to secure.
6. Cut the loops at the bottom and trim the tassel to the desired length.
7. This is a normal tassel. If you like the look, then you're done! If you want to fill it out, keep reading.
8.  Repeat the first two steps of a regular tassel. Begin by wrapping yarn around your fingers 25-30 times.
9. Use a 10" piece of yarn to double knot the top of your tassel together so that both ends are equal.
10. Do not add a band to this tassel. Go straight to cutting the loops at the bottom, but do not cut the 10" piece of yarn that ties the tassel at the top.
11. Grab your first tassel (the one with the band) and flip it upside down to find the center of the strings.

12. Use a needle to guide one end of the 10" piece of yarn from your second tassel through the bottom middle of your first tassel so that it comes out on the left of the knot at the top of the first tassel.
13. Use a needle to guide the other end of the 10" piece of yarn from the second tassel through the bottom middle of your first tassel so that it comes out on the right of the knot at the top of the first tassel.
14. Grab the two piece of yarn that you threaded through to the top of the tassel and pull them tight, to pull the second tassel firmly up against the first tassel. Double knot the two yarns to secure all pieces of your tassel together.
15. Trim the bottom of the tassel so that everything is the same length and looks cohesive.
There you go! A fool proof way to cheat on your tassels so that they are full a voluptuous. I've used this technique on a couple of my weaves, including the one I shared above and the one below. If you use this technique be sure to tag me on Instagram @hellohydrangea so that I can see!


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